Alzheimer’s Disease: Awareness, Funding and a Cure

The baby boomers, who make up nearly a third of society, are now 65 years old. As this population continues to grow, the number of Americans with Alzheimer's and other dementias is increasing.

Current estimates suggest that one in eight baby boomers will develop Alzheimer's disease, and even if they don't, they will become a caregiver for someone who has it.

It is estimated that 7.1 million people aged 65 years and over will be affected by Alzheimer's disease by 2025. You can click over here to know more about Alzheimer's disease.

Image Source: Google

This is a 40% increase compared to those currently affected. Without breakthroughs to slow, stop, or prevent disease, that number could triple to about 13.8 million by 2050.

However, it is the only disease on this list for which there is no way to slow, prevent, or cure its progression.

The sad reality is that deaths from Alzheimer's increased 68% between 2000 and 2010, while deaths from other serious diseases decreased.

The figures may be even higher than stated because many of the deaths are due to the decline caused by advanced symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, but not the disease itself.

The money spent on Alzheimer's research is relatively small. At just half a billion dollars a year, that pales in comparison to the more advertised money spent on other disease research.

Significant progress has been made in the better-funded treatment and understanding of this disease thanks to the development of the research infrastructure needed to support the work of cure and prevention.